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New Tables Compare ACT to SAT Scores

ACT and the College Board have released new concordance tables that allow users to compare scores from the new SAT test (redesigned in 2016) and the ACT test. The 2018 ACT/SAT concordance tables, derived from a joint comprehensive research study conducted by the two organizations over the past nine months, are based on scores of nearly 600,000 graduating seniors in the class of 2017 who took both tests. ACT and the College Board, with engagement from the NCAA technical committee, periodically produce concordance tables to assist in comparing scores of students who may complete different tests. The ACT and the SAT measure similar but not identical content and skills, and they employ different score scales. The ACT Composite score is based on a scale of 1 to 36, while the SAT Total score ran...

What Is NOT Changing About the ACT® Test

Moving the ACT university admissions test to computer format means more testing opportunities and much faster ACT scores (delivered in days instead of weeks), giving you more time to plan your path to university. But keep this in mind: there is also a lot that’s NOT changing on the ACT test. This is good news for all students, but especially students who have already either taken the ACT test and wish to take it again, or those who have begun preparation. In short, the only big thing that’s changing is the delivery of the test. That’s it—instead of filling in ovals on paper score sheets using a No. 2 pencil, you will take the ACT test on a computer. So, if you have been preparing to take the test for a long time only to hear about changes coming, you can breathe easy. Your preparation is g...

Myths and Facts about ACT® Computer-Based Testing

Starting this September, non-US students taking the ACT university admissions test will do so using computer-based testing (CBT), which offers many benefits for students taking the test. Big changes like this sometimes lead to rumors and misinformation about what you can expect from the test. It’s important to know the difference between myths and facts. Some are listed below (and click here to find even more).   MYTH: CBT is a completely different testing experience. FACT: While computer-based ACT testing is a new format, the content of the test itself WILL NOT CHANGE. It’s simply a new, more efficient way to take the test. Examinees will still take the test in a proctored test environment. The good news is they’ll receive scores much faster and have more opportunities to test...

What’s So Great About Computer-Based Testing?

You might have heard about big changes coming to the ACT® university admissions test. Starting in September, all non-US students will take the test in computer-based testing (CBT) format. ACT made this change with students like you in mind. Benefits to computer-based testing include: Faster scoring. With the paper-based ACT test, you’d have to wait four to six weeks to get your scores back. With computer-based testing, you’ll get ACT scores back in two or three business days. Why that’s great: You can plan your future faster! Whether it’s determining if your scores are high enough to get into the university you want to attend, or you want to make plans to study hard and raise your scores, you can get started much earlier. More opportunities to test. Computer-based testing allows ACT to adm...

Taking the ACT From A Student’s Personal Perspective

Our student guest writer details her personal experience taking the ACT and provides her own tips and tricks for what to expect on test day. So much of our education is built on expectations. Our own expectations, our teachers’ expectations, the expectations of our parents, and even our friends. We strive to meet expectations of things like getting on the soccer team, getting good grades, being a good friend. All of the expectations can make adding another expectation, doing well on a test, feel overwhelming. I’m here to share a bit of my personal experience of taking the ACT: what you can expect, what to do, and what it’s like after it’s all done! It’s really not as bad as you might think!!! I am currently a junior in high school, and I have taken the ACT three times –– ...

Colleges and Universities in the US welcome international applicants…

…However, the process of applying can take significant time and effort, sometimes up to two years. Prepare: First, prepare! Prepare, prepare, prepare! Of course, starting with the Pre-ACT is a great way to practice for the ACT and gives you an idea of where you should start. Search Universities: To make the most of your effort, start your search considering the type of university you want to attend. Are you most comfortable in a large setting, interacting with lots of different classmates? Do you want to experience life in a city, where you take a bus across campus, or do you prefer a walking campus? Do you want to know everyone, or is anonymity okay? Are you comfortable attending a ‘commuter’ institution, where many students leave on weekends, or do you aspire to be a part of a thri...